WHERE TO FIND SUITABLE DRINKING WATER

Drinking water, also known as potable water or improved drinking water, is water that is safe to drink or to use for food preparation, without risk of health problems.

Drinking water, also known as potable water or improved drinking water, is water that is safe to drink or to use for food preparation, without risk of health problems. Most of us don’t think about the water we drink. We turn on a tap, fill a glass, and drink. But how much water do you really need to drink every day? Is the water you’re drinking safe or would bottled water be safer? What can you do if your tap water suddenly became contaminated?  Read on to find out how much you know about the drinking water in your own home. The amount of drinking water varies. In as much as water is essential for life, the amount taken by individual depends on the age, health status, physical activities and environmental conditions. An estimation says that an American drink about one litre of water per day, with about 95% of them drinking less than three litres per day. For those who are working under hot climatic conditions, they may be required to drink up to 16 litres per day. The content of water in human body is about 60% in men and about 55% in women. Water covers some 70% of the Earth’s surface. Approximately 97.2% of it is saline, just 2.8% fresh. Potable water is available in almost all populated areas of the Earth, although it may be expensive, and the supply may not always be sustainable. Springs are often used as sources for bottled waters. Tap water, delivered by domestic water systems refers to water piped to homes and delivered to a tap or spigot. For these water sources to be consumed safely, they must receive adequate treatment and meet drinking water regulations.

The most efficient way to transport and deliver potable water is through pipes. Plumbing can require significant capital investment. Some systems suffer high operating costs. The cost to replace the deteriorating water and sanitation infrastructure of industrialized countries may be as high as $200 billion a year. Leakage of untreated and treated water from pipes reduces access to water. Leakage rates of 50% are not uncommon in urban systems

Is Tap Water Safe?

You need to stay hydrated – that’s clear – but is the tap water in your home safe? It is considered generally safe if it comes from a public water system in the United States, such as one run and maintained by a municipality. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has the authority to monitor all public water systems and sets enforceable health standards regarding the contaminants in drinking water. When drinking water leaves a treatment plant on its way to your house, it must meet strict safety standards. That doesn’t mean that your water is free of all contaminants, but that the levels of any contaminants don’t pose any serious health risk. Of course, accidents can happen. If the water supply becomes contaminated by something that can cause immediate illness, the supplier must promptly inform you. Suppliers also need to offer alternative suggestions for safe drinking water. In addition, they have 24 hours to inform customers of any violation of standards that could have major impact on health following a short-term exposure.

Well Water: Safety and Quality

For almost one out of every seven Americans, a private well is the primary source of drinking water. Private wells are not regulated by the EPA.

Bottled Water: Safety and Quality

According to the Beverage Marketing Corporation, Americans drank 9.7 billion gallons of bottled water in 2012, a 6.2% increase over the previous year. One argument advanced for the use of bottled water is its safety, yet there isn’t the same guarantee of safety with bottled water as there is for the water in your tap. The FDA regulates bottled water as a food. That means it requires identification of the source (spring, mineral), regulates allowable levels of chemical, physical, microbial and radiological contaminants, requires Good Manufacturing Practice standards for boiling and bottling, and regulates labelling. However, the FDA doesn’t have the ability to oversee a mandatory testing program like the EPA does with public water suppliers. So, although it can order a bottled water recall once a problem has been found, there is no guarantee that the bottle of water you bought is safe.